Gravity Wave Detector#1

Me and Albert Einstein

Not Charlie Chaplin: That’s me and Albert Einstein. A special moment for me. Not so much for him.

I belong to an exclusive club! I have visited two gravity wave detectors in my life.

Neither of the detectors have ever detected gravity waves, but nonetheless, both of them filled me with admiration for their inventors.

Bristol, 1987 

In 1987, the buzz of the discovery of high-temperature superconductors was still intense.

I was in my first post-doctoral appointment at the University of Bristol and I spent many late late nights ‘cooking’ up compounds and carrying out experiments.

As I wandered around the H. H. Wills Physics department late at night I opened a door and discovered a secret corridor underneath the main corridor.

Stretching for perhaps 50 metres along the subterranean hideout was a high-tech arrangement of vacuum tubing, separated every 10 metres or so by a ‘castle’ of vacuum apparatus.

It lay dormant and dusty and silent in the stillness of the night.

The next day I asked about the apparatus at morning tea – a ritual amongst the low-temperature physicists.

It was Peter Aplin who smiled wryly and claimed ownership. Peter was a kindly antipodean physicist, a generalist – and an expert in electronics.

New Scientist article from 1975

New Scientist article from 1975

He explained that it was his new idea for a gravity wave detector.

In each of the ‘castles’ was a mass suspended in vacuum from a spring made of quartz.

He had calculated that by detecting ‘ringing’ in multiple masses, rather than in a single mass, he could make a detector whose sensitivity scaled as its Length2 rather than as its Length.

He had devised the theory; built the apparatus; done the experiment; and written the paper announcing that gravity waves had not been detected with a new limit of sensitivity.

He then submitted the paper to Physical Review. It was at this point that a referee had reminded him that:

When a term in L2 is taken from the left-hand side of the equation to the right-hand side, it changes sign. You will thus find that in your Equation 13, the term in L2 will cancel.

And so his detector was not any more sensitive than anyone else’s.

And so…

If it had been me, I think I might have cried.

But as Peter recounted this tale, he did not cry. He smiled and put it down to experience.

Peter was – and perhaps still is – a brilliant physicist. And amongst the kindest and most helpful people I have ever met.

And I felt inspired by his screw up. Or rather I was inspired by his ability to openly acknowledge his mistake. Smile. And move on.

30 years later…

…I visited Geo 600. And I will describe this dramatically scaled-up experiment in my next article.

P.S. (Aplin)

Peter S Aplin wrote a review of gravitational wave experiments in 1972 and had a paper at a conference called “A novel gravitational wave antenna“. Sadly, I don’t have easy access to either of these sources.

 

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