First Winter with a Heat Pump

Friends, our first winter with a heat pump is over.

Last week:

  • I switched off the space heating, and…
  • I changed the heating cycle for domestic hot water (DHW) from night-time (using cheap-rate electricity) to day-time (using free solar electricity).

From now until the end of July, I am hopeful that we will be substantially off-grid.

Let me explain…

No Space Heating 

The figure below shows the temperatures relevant to our heating system for the week commencing Saturday 9th April.

The week started cold, with overnight temperatures close to 0 °C and daytime temperatures peaking at 12 °C.

But the week ended with much warmer temperatures, and even in the absence of any heating flow, the household temperature rose above 21 °C. At this point I decided to switch off the space heating. You can see this on the monitoring data below.

Up to the 15th April, the heat pump would operate each evening – you can see this because radiator temperatures oscillated overnight as the heating circuit struggled to deliver a very low heating power.

From the 16th April – with the space-heating off – you can see the radiator temperatures simply fell after the DHW water heating cycle.

Click image for a larger version. Graph showing four temperatures during the week beginning 9th April 2022. The upper graph shows the temperature of radiator flow and the domestic hot water (DHW). The lower graph shows the internal and external temperatures. In the colder weather at the start of the week, the radiator flow temperatures cycled on and off. In the warmer temperatures at the end of the week, heating stopped automatically. On 16th April I switched the space heating circuit off.

Heating DHW during the day 

The next graph shows the same data for the following week. Now there is no space-heating in the house, but the insulation is good enough that household temperature does not fall very much overnight.

On the 20th April I switched from heating the domestic hot water at night (using cheap rate electricity) to heating during the afternoon (using electricity generated using solar PV).

My plan was that by 2:00 p.m., the battery would be substantially re-charged, and heating the hot water at that time would:

  1. Minimise exports to the grid and maximise self-use of solar-generated electricity.
  2. Heat the domestic hot water using air that was ~ 10 °C hotter than it would be at night – improving the efficiency of the heat pump.

Click image for a larger version. Graph showing four temperatures during the week beginning 16th April 2022. The upper graph shows the temperature of radiator flow and the domestic hot water (DHW). The lower graph shows the internal and external temperatures. The radiator flow was switched off. On 20th April I switched from heating the domestic hot water at night to heating during the day.

One can see that household temperature has fallen a little during the week, but only to around 19 °C, which feels quite ‘spring-like’ in the sunshine.

The big picture 

The graph below shows:

  1. The amount of electricity used by the household
  2. The amount of electricity drawn from the grid

It covers the whole of 2021 and the start of 2022 up to today (almost) the end of April. The graphs show running averages over ± 2 weeks.

Click image for a larger version. Graph showing the amount of electricity used by the household each day (kWh/day) and the amount of electricity drawn from the grid each day (kWh/day). Over the 8 months of the winter heating season, 27% was supplied by solar generated electricity.

The 4 kWp solar PV system was installed in November 2020 and was just beginning to make a noticeable difference to our electricity consumption in the spring of 2021.

In March 2021 we installed the Powerwall and immediately dropped off the grid for just over 2 months! In mid-summer we had a run of very poor solar days and we began to draw from the grid again.

In July 2021 we installed a heat pump and this extra load (for DHW) coupled with the decline in solar generation caused us to need to draw a few kWh from the grid each day.

Over the 8 month heating season from the start of August to the end of April, the household used 4,226 kWh of electricity for all the normal activities (~ 2,200 kWh) plus heating using the heat pump (~2,000 kWh). Over this period the heat pump delivered just over 7,000 kWh of heat for a seasonally averaged COP of around 3.5.

However, even in this winter season, only 3,067 kWh were drawn from the grid – mostly at low cost. The balance (27%) was solar generated.

Summer and Winter Settings

The optimal strategy for the Powerwall is now becoming clear.

In the Winter season, daily consumption can reach 25 kWh/day and solar generation is only ~ 2 kWh day. So in this season:

  • We operate the household from the grid during the off-peak hours.
  • We time heavy loads (dishwashing, tumble drying and DHW heating) to take place in the off peak hours.
  • We buy electricity from the grid to fill the battery (13.5 kWh) with cheap rate electricity – and then run the household from the battery for as long as possible. Typically we would need to draw full price electricity from the grid only late in the day.

Click image for a larger version. Images showing the time of day that we have drawn power from the grid (kW) in half-hour periods through the day. Each image shows the average for one month. The graph was assembled using data from the fabulous Powershaper software (link).

In the ‘summer’ season, daily household consumption is ~11 kWh and average solar generation is typically 15 kWh/day. So given that the battery has 13.5 kWh of storage, we can still stay ‘off-grid’ even during a periods of two or three dull days.

So during this period

  • We switch the battery from ‘time-based’ mode to ‘self-powered’ mode.
  • We time heavy loads (dishwashing, tumble drying and DHW heating) to take place in the afternoon.

This year and last year 

Last year (2021), as soon as we installed the Tesla Powerwall battery, we dropped off-grid within days.

But this year (2022) we have an additional daily electrical load. Now we are heating DHW electrically with a heat pump which requires ~ 1.5 kWh/day.

Nonetheless, I hope it will be possible to remain substantially ‘off-grid’ for the next few months. Time will tell.

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One Response to “First Winter with a Heat Pump”

  1. captronnz Says:

    I like your thoughts and data tracking. As the HP is a high pressure appliance have you even considered no heat pump, especially for a new build? Check out DigitalSolarHeat.com & see what you think.

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