Weather Station Comparison

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My new weather station is on the top left of the picture. The old weather station is in the middle of the picture on the right.

Back in October 2015 I installed a weather station at the end of my back garden and wrote about my adventures at length (Article 1 and Article 2)

Despite costing only £89, it was wirelessly linked to a computer in the house which uploaded data to weather aggregation sites run by the Met Office and Weather Underground. Using these sites, I could compare my readings with stations nearby.

I soon noticed that my weather station seemed to report temperatures which tended to be slightly higher than other local stations. Additionally, I noticed that as sunshine first struck the station in the morning, the reported temperature seemed to rise suddenly, indicating that the thermometer was being directly heated by the sunlight rather than sensing the air temperature.

So I began to think that the reported temperatures might sometimes be in error. Of course, I couldn’t prove that because I didn’t have a trusted weather station that I could place next to it.

So in October 2018 I ordered a new Youshiko Model YC9390 weather station, costing a rather extravagant £250.

Youshiko YC9390

The new station is – unsurprisingly – rather better constructed than the old one. It has a bigger, brighter, internal display and it links directly to Weather Underground via my home WI-FI and so does not require a PC. Happily it is possible to retrieve the data from Weather Underground.

The two weather stations are positioned about 3 metres apart and at slightly different heights, but in broad terms, their siting is similar.

Over the last few days of the New Year break, and the first few days of my three-day week, I took a look at how the two stations compared. And I was right! The old station is affected by sunshine, but the effect was significantly larger than I suspected.

Comparison 

I compared the temperature readings of the two stations over the period January 4th, 5th and 6th. The fourth was a bright almost cloudless, cold, winter day. The other two days were duller, but warmer, and all three days were almost windless.

The graphs below (all drawn to the same scale) show the data from each station versus time-of-day with readings to be compared against the left-hand axis.

Let’s look at the data from the 4th January 2019

4th January 2019

Data from the 4th January 2019. The red curve shows air temperature data from the old station and the blue curve shows data from the new station. Also shown in yellow is data showing the intensity of sunshine (to be read from the right-hand axis) taken from a station located 1 km away.

Two things struck me about this graph:

  • Firstly I was surprised by the agreement between the two stations during the night. Typically the readings are within ±0.2 °C and with no obvious offset.
  • Secondly I was shocked by the extent the over-reading. At approximately 10 a.m. the old station was over-reading by more than 4 °C!

To check that this was indeed a solar effect I downloaded data from a weather station used for site monitoring at NPL – just over a kilometre away from my back garden.

This station is situated on top of the NPL building and the intensity of sunlight there will not be directly applicable to the intensity of sunshine in my back garden. But hopefully, it is indicative.

The solar intensity reached just over 200 watts per square metre, about 20% of the solar intensity on a clear midsummer day. And it clearly correlated with the magnitude of the excess heating.

Let’s look at the data from the 5th January 2019

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Data from 5th January 2019. See previous graph and text for key.

The night-time 5th January data also shows agreement between the two stations as was seen on the 4th January.

However I was surprised to see that even on this dismally dull January day – with insolation failing to reach even 100 watts per square metre – that there was a noticeable warming of the old station – amounting to typically 0.2 °C.

The timing of this weak warming again correlated with the recorded sunlight.

Finally let’s look at data from 6th January 2019

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Data from 6th January 2019. See previous graph and text for key.

Once again the pleasing night-time agreement between the two station readings is striking.

And with an intermediate level of solar intensity the over-reading of the old station is less than on the 4th, but more than on the 5th.

Wind.

I chose these dates for a comparison because on all three days wind speeds were low. This exacerbates the solar heating effect and makes it easier to detect.

The figures below show the same temperature data as in the graphs above, but now with the wind speed data plotted in green against the right-hand axis.

Almost every wind speed reading is 0 kilometres per hour, and during the nights there were only occasional flurries.  However during the day, there were slightly more frequent flurries, but as a pedestrian, the day seemed windless.

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Data from 4th of January 2019 now showing wind speed on the right-hand axis.

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Data from 5th of January 2019 now showing wind speed on the right-hand axis.

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Data from the 6th January 2019 showing wind speed against the right-hand axis.

Conclusions 

My conclusion is that the new weather station shows a much smaller solar-heating effect than the old one.

It is unlikely that the new station is itself perfect. In fact there is no accepted procedure for determining what the ‘right answer’ is in a meteorological setting!

The optimal air temperature measurement strategy is usually to use a fan to suck air across a temperature sensor at a steady speed of around 5 metres per second – roughly 18 kilometres per hour! But stations that employ such arrangements are generally quite expensive.

Anyway, it is pleasing to have resolved this long-standing question.

Where to see station data

On Weather Underground the station ID is ITEDDING4 and its readings can be monitored using this link.

The Weather Underground ‘Wundermap’ showing world wide stations can be found here. On a large scale the map shows local averages of station data, but  as you zoom in, you can see teh individual reporting stations.

The Met Office WOW site is here. Search on ‘Teddington’ if you would like to view the station data.

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2 Responses to “Weather Station Comparison”

  1. paulmartin42 Says:

    (I came via STEM electric sausage video)
    I have a collection of weather stations, now on a shelf as a I felt that pumping my data into the “cloud” did not fix their poor forecast – maybe I was harsh ?

    • protonsforbreakfast Says:

      Hi. The way in which weather stations are used with weather forecasts is interesting. The ground based stations are not used AT ALL by the European Centre for Medium Range Forecasting – the world’s best forecast outfit. The Met office use ground based data but it is a tiny fraction of the data input to a forecast. The major inputs to forecasts are satellite estimates of the temperature and humidity through the depth of the atmosphere. The role of the weather stations, including the cheap things we have in our gardens, is to allow the Met Office and Weather Underground to find out whether their forecasts were right!

      So these stations aren’t used for INPUT- that depends on the state of the atmosphere out in the Atlantic – instead they are used to check the OUTPUT of the forecasts. And they need more data – they try to forecast with 300 metre resolution!

      All the best

      Michael

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