Mug Cooling: Salty fingers

You wait years for an article about heat transfer at beverage-air interfaces and then four come along at once!

When I began writing these articles (1, 2, 3) I was just curious about the effect of insulation and lids.

But as I wrote more I had two further insights.

  • Firstly the complexity of the processes at the interface was mind-boggling!
  • Secondly, I realised that cooling beverages are just one example of the general problem of energy and material transfer at interfaces.

This is one of the most important processes that occurs on Earth. For example, it is how the top layer of the oceans – where most of the energy arriving on Earth from the Sun is absorbed – exchanges energy with the deeper ocean and the atmosphere.

But in the oceans there is another factor: salinity.

Salinity 

Sea water typically contains 35 grams of salt per litre of water, and is about 2.4% denser than pure water.

So pure water – such as rain water falling onto the ocean surface – will tend to float above the brine.

This effect is exacerbated if the pure water is warm. For example, water at 60 °C is approximately 1.5% less dense than water at around 20 °C.

Video 

In the video at the top of the article I added warm pure water (with added red food colouring) to a glass of cold pure water (on the left) and a glass of cold salty water (on the right).

[For the purposes of this article I hope you will allow that glasses are a type of mug]

The degree to which the pure and salty water spontaneously separated surprised me.

But more fascinating was the mechanism of eventual mixing – a variant on ‘salt fingering‘.

Salt Fingers Picture

The formation of ‘salty fingers’ of liquid is ubiquitous in the oceans and arises from density changes caused by salt diffusion and heat transfer.

As the time-lapse section of the movie shows – eventually the structure is lost and we just see ‘mixed fluid’ – but the initial stages, filmed in real time, are eerily beautiful.

Now I can’t quite explain what is happening in this movie – so I am not going to try.

But the web has articles, home-made videos and fancy computer simulations.

 

One Response to “Mug Cooling: Salty fingers”

  1. Daniele Says:

    Hi Michael,

    another funny experiment with brine: you can stop convective mixing of salt and fresh water!
    – Prepare a (90% full) glass of fresh water;
    – using a syringe, form a layer of brine 15 mm- 20 mm thick on the bottom of the glass, paying attention not to mechanically mix the two fluids during this operation;
    – put the glass on a flat electrical heater.
    You can generate a temperature gradient of 100 °C between the brine and the fresh water, without boiling phenomena in the two fluid layers.
    all the best

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