Factfullness

Factfullness

Back in December 2010 I wrote about Hans Rosling with a post titled:

Hans Rosling: You’re my hero

Sadly, Hans Rosling died in February 2017.

But aware of his imminent death, he worked with his son and daughter-in-law to write a book which captures some key elements of his world view, which he summarises as…

…Factfulness

The book has two strands that run through all the chapters.

  • The first strand is that we are tremendously ignorant about the world. Repeatedly he expresses his surprise at our levels of ignorance. And given our access to facts, he asks why we are not just randomly ignorant, but have views which are  systematically wrong. He suggests it is a kind of cognitive bias.
  • The second strand is that we can stop being ignorant if we want to. And with this aim, he and his son invented delightful ways to view developmental data.

I won’t try to precis the book, but as someone who experiences intense anxiety in everyday situations, I found the section “Statistics as Therapy” particularly affecting.

As one specific example I went to the download page of Gapminder and downloaded a Powerpoint file with a graph showing how extreme poverty in the world has changed over time.

Extreme Poverty

It is clear that collectively humanity has made truly astonishing progress in reducing the awfulness of crushing poverty. [The Powerpoint file and the web site includes links so you can chase the data sources and check them.]

Why do we not celebrate this fantastic achievement?

This graph tells a good news story compared with which any news story we have experienced in the last 10 years is irrelevant.

This is a story of an epochal and positive change in the world of which most people – including myself – are largely ignorant.

The idea that the world – while acknowledging all its faults and injustices – is dramatically better than it is has ever been, feels like a balm against the ‘news-ification’ of reality that we experience.

Hans Rosling’s Death

I leave you with a video which I find intensely moving.

It shows Hans, his son,and his daughter-in-law explaining why they wrote the book.

Somehow knowing that he is no longer with us feels like a very intense – and despite the fact that I never knew him, personal – loss.

 

Videos

The fact that I feel Hans Rosling’s death personally is probably a cognitive bias caused by his many engaging video appearances.

This page on the Gapminder website contains links to many of his best videos. I cannot recommend them strongly enough.

3 Responses to “Factfullness”

  1. Jenny Says:

    Hi Michael, Mark and I love Hans, his talks are so engaging and encouraging. Thank you for making us aware of the new book. God bless. Jenny W

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