Archive for August, 2017

It’s a shame…

August 2, 2017

JCM_Grave

Pictured above is the humble grave of James Clerk Maxwell.

By all accounts, he was a kind and humble man, and so in many ways it is an entirely appropriate memorial.

But simple as it is, surely we could show our respect and admiration by as simple an act as mowing the grass? It seems not.

My attention was drawn to the unkempt state of his grave by this article in the Scottish Daily Record.

In death we are all equal.

And I have no doubt that Maxwell himself would have wanted no fuss.

But some people – very few – have led such exceptional lives that it is appropriate for us to collectively mark their mortal remains in a way which shows how much we honour their achievements in life.

This is not an indicator of our belief in any kind of saintliness on their part.

It is rather a statement about us.

It is a statement about what we currently admire and treasure and celebrate.

I have been told that Ren Zhengfei, the founder and President of Huawei Technology visited the grave and was embarrassed and shocked.

To neglect the grave of such a monumental figure says something about us.

It is actually a matter of national shame. And while acknowledging that Maxwell was decidedly Scottish, I draw the boundaries of ‘nation-hood’ more widely.

So how great was James Clerk Maxwell?

Maxwell’s many contributions to our modern view of the world are difficult to summarise without being trite, and they span an enormous range. But here are two of his achievements concerning light.

The first colour photograph taken using Maxwell's prescription. (Credit: Wikipedia)

The first colour photograph taken using Maxwell’s prescription. (Credit: Wikipedia)

Having made a breakthrough understanding of the nature of human colour vision, he used that understanding to describe how to take the first colour photograph.

YoungJamesClerkMaxwell

A picture from Wikipedia showing a young James Clerk-Maxwell at Trinity College, Cambridge. He is holding one of his colour wheels that he used to study colour vision.

Later he became the first person to appreciate that light was an electrical phenomenon.

And the equations he wrote down to describe the nature of light are still those we use today to describe just about all electrical and magnetic phenomena*.

Richard Feynman, the person who made the next step in our understanding of the light said:

“From a long view of the history of mankind — seen from, say, ten thousand years from now — there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell’s discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade.”

And Michael de Podesta, the person writing this blog said:

“I named my son after him”

That a true hero should not be honoured in his own land, is a shame on us all.

Surely we could collectively manage to keep the grass on his grave tidy?

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*Note for pedants: In fact the equations we use are a simplified form of Maxwell’s Equations devised by Oliver Heaviside after Maxwell’s tragic early death.

Work Experience

August 2, 2017

Film Crew

 

I had a work experience student with me last week. Let’s call him ‘William’.

On reflection, I am rather concerned about the impression that the “work” he witnessed might have on him.

Firstly

Firstly, everything was very ‘bitty’: it was hard to concentrate on a single task for any period as long as a half day.

And in between explicit tasks, I spent a fair amount of time composing e-mails. That’s right, I said composing, not writing. Because e-mails are generally not simply ‘written’.

For despite the immediacy of the transmission, words in e-mails have to be chosen as carefully as words in a missive that might travel more slowly.

So even though I may appear to be sitting in front of a computer for an hour, I am in fact ‘composing’: plucking words from the vacuum of possibility, and then distilling the raw words to create clear and unambiguous text.

Anyway, I think that bit may have been a bit boring for him.

Secondly

Secondly, although primarily temperature-related, it was extremely diverse.

One activity involved measuring the temperature of the air using our non-contact thermometer and hygrometer (NCTAH).

NCTAH in lab with notes

We set up the experiment in one of NPL’s ultra-stable temperature labs which we normally use for dimensional measurements.

The idea was to compare the temperature indicated by NCTAH with four conventional thermometers. However while NCTAH operated beautifully, it was the readings of the conventional sensors I couldn’t understand.

They indicated that objects in the room were hotter than the air in the room by as much as 0.3 °C. Unfortunately I was in a bit of a rush and I was bamboozled by this result. And I am still working on an answer. However I would have liked him to see something simple ‘just work’. Hey, ho.

And finally…

A film crew visited to interview me about the re-definition of the kelvin. They were charming and professional and genuinely interested in the subject.

They shot a long interview one afternoon, and then the next day they must have spent a good two hours filming me walking.

It wasn’t just walking. We spent a fair amount of time opening doors and then walking. Also walking and then opening doors.

Then it was time for a solid 30 minutes of emerging from corridors, and turning into corridors.

I am not sure what I made of the experience, and I am curious to see what the director Ed Watkins will make of the footage. But he and his colleagues seemed happy as they headed off to film at the PTB in Braunschweig, Germany.

And as for what ‘William’ made of it all, I haven’t a clue. It involved quite a lot of just ‘sitting’ and ‘keeping out of shot’.

But I guess he got to see how documentaries are constructed which might have been the most valuable experience of all.


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