Exactitude and Inexactitude

Exactitude and Inexactitude

After being a professional physicist for more than 30 years, I realised the other day that I write for a living.

Yes, I am a physicist, and I still carry out experiments, do calculations and write computer programs.

But at the end of all these activities, I usually end up writing something: a scientific paper; a report; some notes for myself; or a blog article like this.

But although the final ‘output’ of most of what I do is a written communication of some description, nobody ever taught me to write.

I learned to write by reading what I had written. And being appalled.

Appalled by missed words and typographic errors, and by mangled ideas and inappropriate assumptions of familiarity with the subject matter.

Learning to write is a difficult, painful and never-ending process.

And over and over again I am torn between exactitude – which I seek – and inexactitude, which I have learned to tolerate for two reasons.

  • Firstly, a perfect article which is never completed communicates nothing. Lesson one for writing is that finishing is essential.
  • Secondly, an article which has all the appropriate details will be too long and may never be read by the people with whom I seek to communicate.

So in order communicate optimally, I need to find the appropriate tension between the competing forces of exactitude and inexactitude.

This blog 

When I write for this blog, I try to write articles that are about 500 words long. I rarely succeed.

Typically, I write something. Read it. And then add explanatory text either at the start or at the end?

But with each extra word I type, I realise that fewer and fewer people will read the article and appreciate the clarity of my writing.

And I have to acknowledge that if I had written fewer words I might have communicated something to more people.

Or even communicated more by omitting detail people might find obfuscatory

Indeed I have to acknowledge – and this is hard – that I could have even written something erroneous and communicated something to more people.

For example

For example, in the previous article on the GEO600 Gravity Wave detector, I said that “moving a mirror by half a wavelength of light caused the interferometer to change from constructive to destructive interference.”

Now I know what you are thinking: and yes, it only has to move by a quarter of a wavelength of light.

I realised this before I finished the article but it had already taken hours, and I had already recorded the narrative to the movie.

Similarly, my animation showed one of the reflections coming from the wrong side of a piece of glass (!), and it omitted the normal ‘compensator’ plate in the interferometer.

And how many people noticed or complained? None so far.

So the article was published and presumably communicated something, inexactly and slightly incorrectly. And it was not wholly erroneous.

Exactitude and Inexactitude.

Exactitude and Inexactitude are like two mis-matched protagonists in a ‘buddy movie’.

At the start they hate each other, but over the course of ‘a journey’ in which they are compelled to accompany one another, they learn to love each other for what they are, and to accept each other for what they are not.

Inexactitude: You drive me crazy, but I love you.

4 Responses to “Exactitude and Inexactitude”

  1. Karl-F. Osterhage Says:

    As a non-physicist I had to think about a few minutes, why ‘a quater of the wavelength of light’ and not ‘half the wavelength… ‘, your blog keeps my brain alive, thank You!

  2. carsort Says:

    Love the visualization!

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